Oscars Winners Blackballed??

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At the 2010 Academy Awards, watch essay sites in english proof read thesis custom cv writing services for phd article writing sites source link see url topics titles thesis mba how to pick out the horney girls at the bar http://jeromechamber.com/event/thesis-proposal-powerpoint-presentation-example/23/ watch buy paper online australia viagra peanut butter best writing paper for fountain pens how do i add email to my iphone 7 plus http://bookclubofwashington.org/books/profile-essay-sample/14/ follow site reporting people to social services money can't buy happiness do you agree essay viagra generic on craigs list buy book reports online dissertation introduction chapter outline go to site creative writing minor jmu essay writing tricks https://artsgarage.org/blog/thesis-write-up-grant/83/ see url enter site http://mcorchestra.org/8235-business-plan-capital-required/ seamstress resume get link Mo’Nique wore white gardenias in her hair — just as Hattie McDaniel had in 1940 when she became the first African-American actress to win an Oscar. The Precious star later thanked McDaniel in her best supporting actress acceptance speech “for enduring all that she had to, so that I would not have to.”

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The Hollywood Reporter spoke to Mo’Nique at great length  about the dramatic turn (not for the best) to her career since winning her Oscar.  In the interview Mo’Nique advises that Lee Daniels put her on notice that she is basically blackballed. You all may remember Mo’Nique refused to campaign for her Oscar and it caused quite a stir within the industry as EVERYBODY is suppose to campaign to win. Well Mo’Nique refused and she won, or did she?

Seems to me that Mo’Nique and Hattie McDaniel have a lot in common, check it out:

As reported by the Hollywood Reporter:

 

Is it true you heard Hattie McDaniel’s name during the ceremony when they said your name?

You know, when I was sitting there, and Robin Williams, bless his heart …

That’s right, he presented your award. How sad.

Yes, but what an honor that was. From one comic to another comic, and we know how we both got our start: standing up in little bars with three people there, two of them drunk and one was blind. And now you’re calling my name for this award? I just felt Hattie all over me at that moment, but I didn’t hear her name, per se.

How has the Oscar changed your life? Has it?

I get asked that question a lot: How did the Oscar change my life? What it did was that it gave me a new reality. And it let me know that an award wasn’t going to change my life — that I had to be in control of changing my life. I’ll ask you: How do you think the Oscar was supposed to change my life?

That it made everyone respect you more — that you’re not a comic who acts but an Oscar-winning dramatic actress. A force to be contended with.

And how else do you think it should have changed?

More choices, everyone offering you parts?

What else do you think it should’ve changed? (Laughs.) You know what I’m looking for.

I’m not sure — that it made you happier?

Do you think it should have changed things financially?

Yes.

See? “Yes.” What I understood was that when I won that Oscar, things would change in all the ways you’re saying: It should come with more respect, more choices and more money. It should, and it normally does. Hattie said, “After I won that award, it was as if I had done something wrong.” It was the same with me. I thought, once you won the award, that’s the top prize — and so you’re supposed to be treated as if you got the top prize.

I got a phone call from Lee Daniels maybe six or seven months ago. And he said to me, “Mo’Nique, you’ve been blackballed.” And I said, “I’ve been blackballed? Why have I been blackballed?” And he said, “Because you didn’t play the game.” And I said, “Well, what game is that?” And he gave me no response. The next thing he said to me was, “Your husband is outbidding you.” But he never asked me what [salary] we were asking for. You know, my husband [actor and producer Sidney Hicks] and I had to change things so we wouldn’t have to depend on [others]. So we do it independently. We’re very proud of taking the independent route, and we have a movie coming out on April 24 called Blackbird.

What do you think Lee meant when he said that?

That I was blackballed?

And that your husband was “outbidding you.” What was he referring to?

You know what I learned? Never to think what somebody else was thinking. That’s a question you would have to ask Lee Daniels.* There have been people that have said, “Mo’Nique, she can be difficult. Mo’Nique and her husband can be difficult.” They could probably be right. One of the networks said to [Lee] that I was “really difficult to work with.” And I said, “Well, that’s funny, because I’ve never even worked with them, but OK.”

Whoever those people are who say, “Mo’Nique is difficult,” those people are either heartless, ruthless or treat people like they’re worthless. And that’s unacceptable. They’re set to say, “Mo’Nique is tactless, she’s tacky.” That’s why I have my beautiful husband, because he’s so full of tact, ’cause I’m a girl from Baltimore. I come from a blue-collar town — and being from that place, you learn not to let anybody take advantage of you. You don’t let people mistreat you. You stand up for what’s right.

Did he approach you about maybe being on his hit Fox show Empire?

Well, actually, I was offered the role in The Butler that Oprah Winfrey played. I was also approached by Empire to be on Empire. And I was also offered the role as Richard Pryor‘s grandmother in [Daniels’ upcoming Pryor biopic]. Each of those things that he offered me was taken off the table. (Laughs.) They all just went away. But that’s just part of the business, you know? I can’t be upset at anybody, ’cause life is too good. It’s just what it is.

But you were interested, and the offers suddenly evaporated?

For each of the roles, [Lee] called me. He’s always approached me first, and I’m appreciative of it, because I think he is one of the most brilliant visionaries in writing and directing. I’ll say this: Whenever you do see me on TV again, or in the movies, you’ll know somebody played me fairly. People say to me sometimes, “Mo’Nique, you’re trying to be a mogul.” It’s like, honey, by no meansam I trying to be a mogul — because mogul stands for “money obsessed guys (or girls), usually lonely.” (Laughs.) I don’t want to be a lonely mogul. No.

*Lee Daniels issued this statement to THR in response:

“Mo’nique is a creative force to be reckoned with. Her demands through Precious were not always in line with the campaign. This soured her relationship with the Hollywood community. I consider her a friend. I have and will always think of her for parts that we can collaborate on. However, the consensus among the creative teams and powers thus far were to go another way with these roles.”

 

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Hattie McDaniels Story:

 

On a February afternoon in 1940, Hattie McDaniel — then one of the biggest African-American movie stars in the world — marched into the Culver City offices of producer David O. Selznick and placed a stack of Gone With the Wind reviews on his desk. The Civil War epic, released two months earlier, had become an instant cultural sensation, and McDaniel’s portrayal of Mammy — the head slave at Tara, the film’s fictional Southern plantation — was being singled out by both white and African-American critics as extraordinary. The Los Angeles Times even praised her work as “worthy of Academy supporting awards.” Selznick took the hint and submitted the 44-year-old for a nomination in the best supporting actress category, along with her co-star, Olivia de Havilland, contributing to the film’s record-setting 13 noms.

The 12th Academy Awards were held at the famed Cocoanut Grove nightclub in The Ambassador Hotel. McDaniel arrived in a rhinestone-studded turquoise gown with white gardenias in her hair. (Seventy years later in 2010, a blue-gown– and white-gardenia–clad Mo’Nique, one of 11 black actors to win Academy Awards since, was the only one to pay homage to McDaniel while accepting her best supporting actress Oscar for Lee DanielsPrecious.) McDaniel then was escorted, not to the Gone With the Wind table — where Selznick sat with de Havilland and his two Oscar-nominated leads, Vivien Leigh and Clark Gable — but to a small table set against a far wall, where she took a seat with her escort, F.P. Yober, and her white agent, William Meiklejohn. With the hotel’s strict no-blacks policy, Selznick had to call in a special favor just to have McDaniel allowed into the building (it was officially integrated by 1959, when the Unruh Civil Rights Act outlawed racial discrimination in California).

A list of winners had leaked before the show, so McDaniel’s win came as no shock. Even so, when she was presented with the embossed plaque given to supporting winners at the time, the room was rife with emotion, wrote syndicated gossip columnist Louella Parsons: “You would have had the choke in your voice that all of us had.” The daughter of two former slaves gave a gracious speech about her win: “I shall always hold it as a beacon for anything I may be able to do in the future. I sincerely hope that I shall always be a credit to my race and the motion picture industry.”

But Hollywood’s highest honor couldn’t stave off the indignities that greeted McDaniel at every turn. White Hollywood pigeonholed her as the sassy Mammy archetype, with 74 confirmable domestic roles out of the IMDb list of 94 (“I’d rather play a maid than be a maid,” was her go-to response). The NAACP disowned her for perpetuating negative stereotypes. Even after death, her Oscar, which she left to Howard University, was deemed valueless by appraisers and later went missing from the school — and has remained so for more than 40 years. Her final wish — to be buried in Hollywood Cemetery — was denied because of the color of her skin.

In her last days, McDaniel threw a deathbed party, coincidentally attended by her grandnephew’s future life partner MaBel Collins, then 15, who recalls “people milling around, drinking, laughing. Guests would go in one or two at a time and visit with her. I had no idea who that dying movie star was until a couple years later, I saw Gone With the Wind — and realized that was Hattie in the bed.”

In her last will and testament, McDaniel left detailed instructions for her funeral. “I desire a white casket and a white shroud; white gardenias in my hair and in my hands, together with a white gard­enia blanket and a pillow of red roses,” she wrote. “I also wish to be buried in the Hollywood Cemetery,” today known as Hollywood Forever Cemetery. But the resting place of numerous showbiz types — including GWTW director Victor Fleming — had a whites-only policy. Hattie was buried at Angelus-Rosedale Cemetery, the first L.A. cemetery open to all races. In 1999, Edgar successfully lobbied to get a marble memorial to McDaniel placed at Hollywood Forever. Source

In 1999, McDaniel received a cenotaph at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Her family decided to keep her remains at the original burial site in Angelus-Rosedale Cemetery.

In 1999, McDaniel received a cenotaph at Hollywood Forever Cemetery. Her family decided to keep her remains at the original burial site in Angelus-Rosedale Cemetery.

While winning the Oscars appears to be peaches and cream for many, it certainly was not for Mo’Nique nor Hattie McDaniel.  It’s a great thing that man does not determine your destiny Mo’Nique, check your attitude and keep it moving forward, the best is yet to come chile!

 


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